80 Most Common Spanish Adjectives & How to Use Adjectives in Spanish + PDF Download

Have you ever had to describe any kind of presentation or a situation but struggled to find the right words? Sometimes simple adjectives such as “grande” or “bueno” are not enough to express your complex thoughts and opinions.

To avoid this situation, it’s helpful to know other common Spanish adjectives, too! SpanishPod101 (one of our reputable partners) made a useful video on the adjectives every student has to know:

In this blog post, you will learn the most common adjectives to qualify different aspects of life or people’s character traits. And all of this, with examples!

1. Common Spanish adjectives to describe physical appearance

Knowing common Spanish adjectives to describe physical appearance is useful when describing people or things. Here are the most common ones you can use in your Spanish sentences:

SpanishEnglish
GrandeBig
Pequeño/PequeñaSmall
Alto/AltaTall
Bajo/BajaShort (height)
Largo/LargaLong
Corto/CortaShort (length)
Bonito/BonitaPretty
Feo/FeaUgly
Guapo/GuapaHandsome, beautiful
Delgado/DelgadaThin
Gordo/GordaFat
JovenYoung
Viejo/ViejaOld

But what’s it worth without real-life examples? Here’s a dialogue that could help you:

María: ¡Hola Juan! Te ves muy guapo y delgado. [Hi Juan! You look very handsome and thin.]
Juan: Gracias, he estado haciendo ejercicio. ¿Y tu auto nuevo? [Thanks, I’ve been exercising. And your new car?]
María: Es un auto pequeño pero bonito. No es rápido pero sí barato en gasolina. [It’s a small but pretty car. Not fast but cheap on gas.]
Juan: Un auto pequeño, bonito y económico suena perfecto. [A small, pretty, and economical car sounds perfect.]

2. Adjectives in Spanish for personality and behavior

Adjectives describing personality and behavior help us understand and communicate about someone’s character traits.

Check out these ones:

SpanishEnglish
Bueno/BuenaGood
Malo/MalaBad
AmableKind
Antipático/AntipáticaUnfriendly
Generoso/GenerosaGenerous
Tacaño/TacañaStingy
InteligenteIntelligent
Tonto/TontaFoolish
Simpático/SimpáticaNice, friendly
Mentiroso/MentirosaLiar
Honesto/HonestaHonest
FielFaithful
InfielUnfaithful
CapazCapable
IncapazIncapable
Educado/EducadaPolite
Grosero/GroseraRude
ValienteBrave
CobardeCowardly
Curioso/CuriosaCurious
Abierto/AbiertaOpen (minded)
Cerrado/CerradaClosed (minded)
Interesado/InteresadaInterested
Desinteresado/DesinteresadaUninterested
Perezoso/PerezosaLazy
Trabajador/TrabajadoraHardworking
Atrevido/AtrevidaDaring
Timido/TimidaShy

Let’s put all of this into context:

Ana: ¿Qué tal la nueva compañera? [How about the new co-worker?]
Pablo: Me pareció antipática y grosera, aunque inteligente. [I found her unfriendly and rude, though intelligent.]
Ana: Yo la vi educada pero cerrada de mente. [I saw her as polite but closed-minded.]
Pablo: Espero que sea más abierta y amable. [I hope she becomes more open and kind.]
Ana: Sí, hay que darle tiempo. [Yes, we need to give her time.]

3. Use adjectives in Spanish for emotions and feelings

We already have a dedicated article about emotions in Spanish but it’s still good to know the best adjectives to use in Spanish conversations.

a happy and a sad emoji illustrating the most common spanish adjectives on a sheet of paper
SpanishEnglish
FelizHappy
TristeSad
Contento/ContentaHappy, content
Enojado/EnojadaAngry
Tranquilo/TranquilaCalm
Nervioso/NerviosaNervous
AlegreCheerful
Serio/SeriaSerious
Cariñoso/CariñosaAffectionate

Talking about your emotions and feelings can be liberating, so why not check this short conversation:

Hija: Es que reprobé un examen importante. Estoy enojada conmigo misma. [I failed an important exam. I’m angry with myself.]
Mamá: No te preocupes, todos cometemos errores. Mantente tranquila. [Don’t worry, we all make mistakes. Stay calm.]
Hija: Es difícil estar tranquila, me siento muy nerviosa. [It’s hard to stay calm, I feel very nervous.]
Mamá: Ven aquí, dame un abrazo cariñoso. Todo va a estar bien. [Come here, give me an affectionate hug. Everything will be okay.]
Hija: Gracias mamá, me haces sentir más contenta. [Thanks mom, you make me feel happier.]

4. Use Spanish adjectives for condition and state

The following table is full of the qualities or characteristics you can use in Spanish to describe conditions and states.

SpanishEnglish
Nuevo/NuevaNew
Viejo/ViejaOld
FácilEasy
DifícilDifficult
Rápido/RápidaFast
Lento/LentaSlow
CalienteHot
Frío/FríaCold
Caro/CaraExpensive
Barato/BarataCheap
Limpio/LimpiaClean
Sucio/SuciaDirty
FuerteStrong
Ruidoso/RuidosaNoisy
Silencioso/SilenciosaQuiet
Sano/SanaHealthy
Enfermo/EnfermaSick

Imagine you run a marathon and you’re in a special condition, then your amigo runs up to you after the finish line:

Amigo: ¿Qué tal el maratón? [How was the marathon?]
Tú: Muy difícil, el recorrido largo y caliente. [Very difficult, the route was long and hot.]
Amigo: ¿Pero cruzaste rápido la meta? [But you crossed the finish line fast?]
Tú: Sí, pero me siento enfermo. [Yes, but I feel sick.]
Amigo: Toma un batido frío y sano. [Have a cold, healthy smoothie.]
Tú: Refrescante después de la carrera ruidosa. [Refreshing after the noisy race.]

5. List of Spanish adjectives for value and quality

And these adjectives describing value and quality help us truly evaluate and judge things or situations.

SpanishEnglish
ImportanteImportant
InteresanteInteresting
Aburrido/AburridaBoring
Justo/JustaFair
Injusto/InjustaUnfair
Famoso/FamosaFamous
Desconocido/DesconocidaUnknown
Seguro/SeguraSure
Inseguro/InseguraUnsure

And you can use these adjectives in Spanish to talk about even the best movies in Spanish:

Amiga: ¿Viste la nueva película? Dicen que es interesante. [Did you see the new movie? They say it’s interesting.]
Tú: No, ¿es de un director famoso? [No, is it from a famous director?]
Amiga: Sí, el mismo que hizo esa injusta y aburrida. [Yes, the same one who made that unfair and boring one.]
Tú: Oh no, no estoy segura entonces. [Oh no, I’m not sure then.]
Amiga: Pero tiene buenas críticas, dicen que es justa e importante. [But it has good reviews, they say it’s fair and important.]
Tú: Está bien, le daré una oportunidad. [Okay, I’ll give it a chance.]

6. Learn Spanish adjectives on our website

One more thing to admit is that learning adjectives in Spanish is one of the most important steps you can take on your language learning journey.

They come in different forms:

  1. possessive
  2. demonstrative
  3. descriptive

Each one of these has a specific grammatical purpose, and you can spice up your sentences with them to sound more like a native. Check our dedicated article on the website to learn more about adjective types and their grammar structures.

7. Practice common Spanish adjectives with our Practice Worksheet Library

It’s not enough to check the article for the most common Spanish adjectives, you also have to practice them!

Do you want to learn more? Click the button now and get access to our full practice exercises!

8. Conversation Based Chunking Guide to Spanish vocabulary and adjectives

On Effortless Conversations, we value the time you invest in language learning. The more time you spend learning and analysing a language, the better you’ll get. But we have one tip for you, and it’s… Conversation Based Chunking.

This is a method which will put you on a fast-track to learn Spanish, learn German, or any other language with the help of lexical chunks. What are these?

They are the natural building blocks of the language that native speakers use all the time. So, instead of focusing too much (or all the time) on grammar, you should immerse yourself in Spanish using different methods, and pick up the best things from our Spanish Chunking Starter Pack.

What are you waiting for? Grab your copy now, it’s FREE!

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